This is the space for you and your group members to work on your chapter, Information Literacy Models | - | Supplemental materials. Ask questions, point out issues, write and edit text that can be placed in the wikibook.

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Research steps to success (Sandra Hughes)
**http://www3.sympatico.ca/sandra.hughes/sandra.hughes/research/researchs.html**

1 preparing for research.

2 accessing resources.

3 processing information

4 transfer your learning



8Ws
http://eduscapes.com/tap/topic71.htm
·**Watching** (Exploring)
·**Wondering** (Questioning)
·**Webbing** (Searching)
·**Wiggling** (Evaluating)
·**Weaving** (Synthesizing)
·**Wrapping** (Creating)
·**Waving** (Communicating)
·**Wishing** (Assessing)


I-search
http://www.literacymatters.org/content/isearch/action.htm
Phase 1: Becoming Immersed in a Topic and Generating a Question
Phase 2: Developing a Search Plan
Phase 3: Gathering and Integrating Information
Phase 4: Representing Knowledge

Pathways to knowledge
http://www.sparkfactor.com/clients/follett/home.html
1.Appreication
2.Research
3.Search
4.Interrrpreation
5.Communication
6.Evaluation
Research cycle (Mc Kenize)[1]



REACTS
http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/stripling.htm
  • Recalling
  • Explaining
  • Analyzing
  • Challenging
  • Transforming
  • Synthesizing

  • Research asst
http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/researchassistant.htm
  • Understand assignment
  • Select topic
  • General reading on topic
  • Formulate thesis
  • Conduct library research
  • Make an outline
  • Write a first draft
  • Get supporting materials for argument
  • Review and revise
  • Final form



Big6[2]
1. Task Definition
2. Information Seeking Strategies
3. Location and Access
4. Use of Information
5. Synthesis
6. Evaluation

Super 3
Beginning
Middle
End
http://academic.wsc.edu/redl/classes/tami/super3.html
http://big6.com/presentations/super3dinos/
http://205.213.162.11/project_big6/super3/super3.htm
Composition
http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/composition.htm

InfoZone (from the Assiniboine South School Division of Winnipeg, Canada.)
Wondering
Seeking
Choosing
Connecting
Producing
Judging
http://www.pembinatrails.ca/infozone/
http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/infozone.htm

Irving’s(Ann Irving)
Formulating
Identifying
Tracing
Examining
Using
Recording
Interpreting
Shaping
Evaluating
http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/irving.htm

Noodletools (Debbie Abilock)
Engaging
Defining
Initiating
Locating
Examining, Selecting, Comprehending, Assessing
Recording, Sorting, Organizing, Interpreting
Communicating, Synthesizing
Evaluating
http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/noodletools.htm
http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/information/1over/infolit1.html

Pre-search (Virginia Rankin)
Presearch Strategies, Generating Questions, Student Assessment
§Step 1 - Presearch
§Step 2 - Plan the search
§Step 3 - Search for information
§Step 4 - Select information
§Step 5 - Interpret and record information
§Step 6 - Evaluate information
§Step 7 - Communicate the information
§Step 8 - Evaluate the process
http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/presearch.htm

DIALOGUE
Define
Initiate
Assess
Locate
Organize
Guide
Use
Evaluate
http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/dialogue.htm
http://www.infohio.org/ID/dialogue.html

FLIP IT (Alice Yucht)
Focus
Links
Input
Payoff
IT!
http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/flipit.htm
http://www.aliceinfo.org/flipit/
ISP (Carol Kuhlthau)
Initiating a Research Assignment
Selecting a Topic
Exploring Information
Formulating a Focus
Collecting Information
Preparing to Present
Assessing the Process

http://virtualinquiry.com/inquiry/ips.htm
http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Feb-99/kuhlthau.html

Comparison


Information literacy requires students to utilize their critical thinking skills in order to successfully uncover and synthesize information. Although designed to foster and promote inquiry by the students, each strategy has its own unique recipe to achieve this goal.

The Search & Use strategies are designed to promote higher-order thinking and decision making by students. The Information Inquiry Model provides opportunities for revision and reconsideration of the information while encouraging its integration. The Discipline Specific Models, unlike the others, were designed for certain areas of study, such as math and science.

Figure 2.1 provides a visual comparison of various stages from a few strategies.
Figure_2.1.jpg

What is an Information Literacy Model and how is it relevant?


The American Library Association (ALA) provided the widely held definition of Information Literacy in 1989 stating that it is the "ability to recognize when information is needed and locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information" (O'Connor, 2009). Students sometimes have a hard time determining what information is good and what is not. Information is expanding every day and some of that information is not valid. In addition to validity there is some information that is outdated and some that comes from opinion rather than a reptuable source. Students need some way to help them learn what information to look at and how to look. A tool to help students sift through all of the information out there is by using an Information Literacy Model, or Inquiry Model. This serves to illustrate how educators and students can carry out the process of information inquiry. While for some students the process of finding, researching, and analyzing information may come easily, most need additional guidance. A variety of literacy models are available for educators to make use of no matter the subject area or grade level they teach. While some models have been developed specifically for use in processes including thinking, writing, and instructional design, often times educators will edit a model or combine several models to fit the individual needs of a student or classroom (Callison & Lamb, 2006; Kellow, 2008).

Models Effectiveness


These information literacy models are effective tools and allow students to analyze information in a systematic method. They serve as a guide for students to learn and also a guide to help teachers teach the concept of information literacy. These models can be very effective if teachers utilize them. many of these models use graphic organizers or numbered steps to help students break up their search of visualize what they are doing. They are directed to students and can be found for every grade and skill level. All of these tools are practical tools that will help organize student thought so that they may learn new information.







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